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Culver's Public Schools:

Photos

Writings:

A Timeline of Culver's "Educational Trail"

Administration of Culver Schools

An Early History by Mrs. W.O. Osborn

Fred Karst on the History of Culver's Schools

Writings (cont.)

An Indian Maiden Discovers Culver's School by Jeanne Scott

This is Culver High School, from 1952

Our Gymnasium by Floyd Annis

Formal Dedication of the Elementary Building, 1953

Mark Roeder's writing on the history of Culver schools

Yearbooks:

1913 -- 1919 -- 1920 -- 1977 elementary

Culver Grade School children 1893

The grade school children of Culver, 1893. Any details as to names would be appreciated.

Culver Schools closing exercises program 1899 outsideCulver Schools closing exercises program 1899 inside

Program from the April 2, 1897 commencement exercises of the Culver City schools (notice that the town is no longer named "Marmont" by this time, but is not yet termed simply "Culver," as it will be by 1899's commencement program).

Interestingly, the commencement took place in the lavish Colonnade Hotel on today's Lake Shore Drive (it was located just west of the movie theater in that area, on the north side of the street, which was then Toner Avenue). By 1899, the beautiful and ornate Colonnade would be burned to the ground.

Union Twp. Schools Commencement program 1899 Union Twp. Schools Commencement program 1899 Union Twp. Schools Commencement program 1899

The twelfth annual commencement of the Union Township schools took place on May 11, 1899 at the Christian church in the Maxinkuckee Village. There are several fascinating historical facts visible here. First of all, this ceremony presumably celebrated the graduation of students from the various local, one-room school houses (such as the Maxinkuckee school, the Washington school, etc.) in the outlying areas of the Township besides Culver (most of the one-room school houses were emptied more than a decade later when Indiana passed a law forbidding children to walk more than two miles to school, thus consolidating most schools into one and causing students to be bussed into school, many in this area to the Culver school). The schools appear to be identified by number in the lists of teachers on page 4 of the program.

Secondly, the commencement took place at the Christian church in the Maxinkuckee Village, a building which still stands and is occupied today by Rudith Sheridan, wife of the late Episcopal Bishop C.R. Sheridan, located on 18B Road approximately a mile east of its intersection with East Shore Drive. The church would later become an Evangelical church before its eventual conversion into a private residence.

1899 CHS Grad program page 1

1899 Culver High School Graduation program 02

1899 Culver High School Graduation program 03

1899 Culver High School Graduation program 04

The Reformed Church in Culver was the site of the 1899 Culver High School commencement, which took place on May 12 (notice that the graduating class consists of 5 students!). The Reformed Church was actually Grace Reformed Church -- today Grace United Church of Christ -- located on Plymouth Street between Lake Shore Drive and Cass Street.

Undated Photo

An undated photo shows Culver public school teachers, probably near the turn of the century.

1901 Photo

A 1901 photo of Culver school children, taken by Keene Photography. The children are unidentified.

Rutland School Children 01 Rutland School Children 02

A photo from the Marshall County Historical Museum depicting the Rutland School's children in 1904. The accompanying newspaper article, at right, identifies a number of the children. Both items are from the collection of the Marshall County Historical Museum's collection.

Culver High School Construction

Construction of the Culver High School, probably 1906, as Mark Roeder's History of Culver and Lake Maxinkuckee reports that the first school built on School Street was the one built in 1906, which stood for decades as it appears in the above photo, before the Culver Elementary School was built in 1952. Interestingly, Roeder notes that one of the first Culver schools was built on Ohio & Jefferson Streets, where the Osborn Hotel (demolished 1990) would eventually stand, and that the hotel used part of one of the existing school buildings as a base for its construction.

CHS Graduation program 1906 page 1CHS Graduation program 1906 page 2CHS Graduation program 1906 page 3CHS Graduation program 1906 page 4

The 1906 Culver High School commencement took place May 4 at the Methodist Episcopal church on the southwest corner of Main and Jefferson Streets. This program -- part of the Stahl family collection -- includes some well-known local names involved in the ceremony.

Unknown Photo

This photo, also a large print from the Cleveland collection, has "7-20-07" printed on it, and depicts a group gathered around the lighthouse in Vandalia Park. The flags held by a few of the people appear to say, "Scientific Club." Any information available would be welcomed.

Maxinkuckee Village School

A photo of the horse drawn school bus for the Maxinkuckee village school, taken in 1909 or 1910. The school building still stands at the corner of 18B and Queen Roads on the northern corner of the Bigley orchard and farm property. Ira Mattix, according to the caption here, was the driver

Culver HS 1912

Postcard dated 1912 depicting the Culver High School at that time.

1912 Postcard

A colorized version of a 1912 postcard depicting the Culver High School.

Culver Grade School teachers 1912-1915

Culver's grade school teachers, circa 1912-1915, including Edna Stahl. This photo comes from the Stahl family collection. Any details as to teacher names would be appreciated. The photo was taken outside of the Culver school.

Undated Photo

An undated, but obviously early photo of one of the classes of Culver's public school. Can anyone identify any of the students here?

1914 Diploma

A 1914 High School Diploma from Culver High School, courtesy of the Marshall County Historical Museum.

Domestic Science

A 1914 or 1915 photo of the 8th grade "domestic science" class at Culver school includes May Rhodes, Rose Moss, Mary Cook, a Shively girl, and Vada Kowatch, among others, according to the caption on this photo from the Marshall County Historical Museum's collection. The girl 2nd from the right is identified in handwriting as "Payson," but this seems impossible if the date is correct. Edward Payson, the first in his family in the Culver area, attended school at Culver Academy in the early 1920s and his daughter, Martha, was not born until well after that. The girl in the photo could be Dorothy Eisenhard, who would grow up to marry Edward Payson and become a Payson. Click here to learn more.

Culver Elementary class of 1916-17

One of the Culver schools' elementary classes, 1916-1917, a photo from the Stahl family collection. Any assistance with specific names of children would be welcome.

Culver Elementary School 1st grade class April 1916

Culver Elementary's first grade class photographed in April of 1916, a photo from the Stahl family collection.

Culver Elementary School twins, undated Stahl photo

An April, 1917 photo from the Stahl family collection showing the unusually high number of twin children in Culver Elementary's first grade class that year

Culver Elementary children in downtown Culver faill, 1924

Wonderful and rare photo from the Stahl family collection, depicting the second grade class in the fall of 1924 -- along with teacher Edna Stahl -- walking down South Main Street (the camera is facing south). On the left can be seen the O.T. Goss hardware (today Snyder's, in the same building) and even the vacant lot just north of the hardware store.

Culver Elementary first grade class Sept. 1924

Culver Elementary's first grade class photographed in September of 1924, a photo from the Stahl family collection.

Culver Elementary 1st grade Sept. 1925

Culver Elementary school's first grade class in September, 1925, posing in front of the school. If anyone can identify the children in the photo, please contact us.

Misc. School Children Unidentified Stahl Collecion late 1800s

Presumably a class photo from Culver schools, this unmarked, unidentified photo was part of the Stahl family collection (Edna Stahl was a teacher in the school, and many of the family photos are from Culver schools, circa 1890s-1920s). Help identifying the people in this photo would be appreciated.

Stahl family members unidentified Feb., 1927

This photo from the Stahl family collection was dated February, 1927, though no names are given to identify the individuals, who may be teachers from Culver schools, where Edna Stahl taught for decades.

Mrs. Edna Stahl and Culver Elementary students, undated

Miss Edna Stahl and a handful of her elementary school students in an undated photo from the Stahl family collection. Help in identifying the students would be welcome.

4th Grade Class

Above: the 4th grade class at Culver Elementary in 1930.

Culver Elementary class photo 1930

A March 10, 1930 class picture from Culver Elementary school (which grade is shown here is uncertain) from the Stahl family collection.

Culver Elementary School children 1931-32 playground

One of Culver Elementary school's first grade classes, 1931-1932, photographed on the school playground. Students of the day may recall the "witch's hat" playground equipment seen in the background of this photo, which comes from the Stahl family collection. It would be 20 years before a new set of equipment replaced the existing playground equipment.

Punch & Judy Front Punch & Judy Back

The front (top) and back (below) of the program from a Culver Elementary school play, "Punch & Judy." Judging by some of the names in the program, the play probably took place in the mid-1930s. Any further information would be appreciated!

Maxinkuckee School House Sale

This 1938 Culver Citizen article details the sale of the Maxinkuckee school house to John Bigley. According to the article, the school was built around 1908. It still sits today on the corner of 18B and Queen Roads and is being renovated, having been used alternately as a part of the Bigley apple orchard operation and also left empty for many years. It served the once-growing village of Maxinkuckee in the same vicinity.

1939 Scorecard 01    1939 Scorecard 02

A 1939 Culver High School Basketball scorecard chock full of interesting advertisements and other information about the era. Sides 1 and 2 are presented here. Thanks to the Marshall County Historical Museum for these images.

Joseph Lee Currews age 6 and Edna Stahl 1940

Joseph Lee Currews, age 6, and Mrs. Stahl, May, 1940, is the caption on the back of this photo from the Stahl family collection, taken in front of Culver School..

Maxinkuckee Overture

"Maxinkuckee Overture" - Rare sheet music written by longtime Culver high school band director Richard Bowles, "Maxinkuckee Overture" was a loan from the Kim Amond collection (click here to view the sheet music)

Commencement

Culver High School's commencement, May 12, 1949, courtesy the Kim Amond collection.

Culver High School class of 1949-50

Culver High School juniors, class of 1949-1950, a photo provided by Millie Isom.

Culver High School 1952

The Culver High School as it looked in 1952 (the building became the Culver Elementary school in later years and is still part of the Elementary School).

Concrete Pouring

This picture shows the concrete being poured for the "new" school building in 1952, which became the section of Culver Elementary School that was expanded a few years back.

Study Hall 1952

1952 photo of a study hall at the Culver High School, which at the time was housed in today's Culver Elementary.

Elementary Montage 01 Elementary Montage 02

Two montages of photos of the Culver Elementary School from November, 1952. The school was then moving into its current building, a renovation and expansion of the existing one, which had served all grades. The current high school (as a separate building from the elementary), however, was not erected until the 1960s. The left image shows the move from the old building to the new, expanded facility. The right image shows scenes of the playground equipment which was new at the time (it was replaced in the late 1980s by equipment that was replaced again in the early 2000s when the school expanded).

Easrly 1970s Photo

This early 1970s photo shows the Culver Elementary school as it appeared from  the back, or west end in years gone by. Visible is the incinerator smokestack and maintenance building that disappeared in  the 1980s, in part to make way for the media center that is still in use today.

Pom-Pom Girls

Pom-pom girls from the Culver High School, marching down Ohio St. in April of 1970, as photographed by White Photography.

The Culver Community Schools' Official website (including views of the schools today)

Historical Writings on the History of Culver's Public Schools

A Timeline of Culver's "Educational Trail" to 1963

1787 - Northwest Ordinance includes Article stating education

to be encouraged

1791 - 10th Amendment, U.S. Const. Places

res­ponsibility for education with States.

1790’s - Public education began in Indiana Terr. with

establishment of parochial schools,

Presbyterian, Methodist, Catholic, 1816 -Indiana 1816 Const. state General Assembly to provide for general system of  education in gradation to university.

Parochial education in area,-- Father  Badin, Twin Lakes Rev. Isaac McCoy, Niles and N. Indiana.  1831 - Enacted statute provides that 3 trustees are to control school & Cong. Twp. Funds.

1834 - 1st general school law provides for rural school and

county seminaries.

1836-37 - Thomas McDonald starts first Union  Twp. school,

1840 - 3 schools in Marshall Co; 1st school, Aubbeenaubee

Twp; 1841., 1st School, Tippecanoe Twp.

1842 - Both district and subscription schools included in

educational system.

1848 - In State Referendum on Free Schools, Un­ion Twp. vote:

38 for; 21 against.

1851 -  Indiana 1st state to provide in its new  constitution

(Art.8) for free public education.

1852 -  Gen. Assembly statute permits tax levy on property for schools.(It was not until after Civil War that levies were authorized to finance educ.)

New statute places schools under 1 trustee instead of three.

1853 -  Beginning of graded school system. 1862 – Records show 84 schools, Marshall Co.

1874 - Average school term length: 6.4 months. 1875 -Record shows 130 Schools, Marshall Co.

1840-1979 - Aubbeenaubee Twp. has been served by 11 schools, -- Leiters Ford, Delong, Sandhill, Beaver, Myers, Paw Paw (Smallpox), Hartman, Ditmire, Polley, Hays (MT. Hope), and Ellis.

1841-1979 - Tippecanoe Twp. has been served by 11 schools;-- 1841 Campbell, 1889 La. Fountain, 1880 Casey, 1889 Get-A-Way, 1900 Center, 1912 Meeks, 1844 Monterey, Wilson, Wade., O.K.,Lawton (Mud College).

1850-1960 - North bend Twp. served by 8, schools,

Parker, 1880 Schmidt, Horner, Kelly, Bass Lake (Winona), 189 7 Ora, 1913 North Bend and Williams.

1836-1979 - Union Twp. served by 15 schools,-­1899 Culver H.S; Culver Elementary, burr Oak, Hibbard, Rutland, Maxinkuckee, Washington, Kaley, Mt. Pleasant, Hillside, Sickman, Poplar Grove, 1864 Shaw, Kaley (Zion).

1894 Culver Military  Academy opens.

1897 – 1st North Bend Twp. H.S.

1899 – 1st graduating class Culver H.S.

1900 – 1-roon school bldgs. doomed as new State limits walking distance to 2-miles. Horse drawn hacks used to transport pupils, as districts consolidate.

1902 – Culver Summer Naval School established.

1906 – Culver School Bldg. Dedicated.

1907 – CMA Summer Cavalry School Opens.

1920 – School Bd. Purchase 10-acre site (Sch. St.)

1912 – CMA Woodcraft Camp begins

1913 – New N. Bend Twp. H.S. dedicated.

1915 – Cit. Mil Tr. Camp at CMA (CMTC)

1921 – New 3-story Culver H.S. Bldg. dedicated.

1929 – Local Public School become Twp. School

         – New community Bldg. Dedicated.

1930 – Monterey H.S. destroyed by fire.

1931 – N. Bend H.S. discontinued.  Students transferred to Culver, Knox.

1936 – Dedicate new Monterey H.S.

1942 – CMA Junior College Organized

1945 – Aubbeenaubbee H.S. destroyed by fire

1951-52 – New Aubbeenaubbee H.S. dedicated

1952 – New Culver Elementary Bldg. Dedicated

1959 – State School Reorganization Law enacted

1963 – State approves area reorganized school district,-- Aubbeenaubbee, W, Bend, Union Twp.,

Administration - Culver Public Schools  1899 – 1979

- Superintendent of Schools -

1899-1911 – I.S. Hahn

1911-1914 – W.P. Bland

1914-1915 – Lenore McLaughlin

1915-1916 – James D. Darnell

1916-1917 – Lenore McLaughlin

1917-1925 – Deane E. Walker

1925-1929 – J. L. Tombaugh

- Principal -

(NOTE: In 1929 the Culver School Board turned over Public Schools to jurisdiction of Twp. Trustee)

1929-1954 – Floyd M. Annis

1954-1960 – Raymond M. Ives

1960-1963 – Kenneth Cole. Mr. Cole continued as principal of CHS, until 1966.

1963-1966 – Frank McLane

1966-1971 – Robert Rust

1971-1977 – A.F. Allen

1977-      – William Mills

1998 – Brad Schuldt

 

The first high school course offered to pupils of Union Township started in the fall of 1896 with Prof. I. B. Hahn, Superintendent and Miss Edith Scheurman, Principal.  Only a three year high school course was given.

The first class to graduate from the three year course was in 1899.  The first graduates from Culver High School were Otto Stahl, Florence Barber, Daisy Voreis and Nell Garn. There were no graduates from the high school in 1900.

In 1901 there were seven graduates—Lucretia Rea, Edwinna McFarland, Edward Zechiel, Elmer Scheurman, Harvey Scheurman, Maude Newman, and Levi Osborn. The 1902 graduates were Claude Newman, Edna Stahl, Edna Hayes, Maude Koontz, Charity Shaw, Chester Zechiel, and Core Quick.

In 1903 there were four graduates, Myrtle Medbourn, Lulu Blanchard, Grace Voreis, and Clark Ferrier. There was no graduating class in 1904 since the high school had now become a four year course.

The first students to graduate with a four year course was in 1905. The first graduates from the four year course were Bess Medbourn, Minnie Shilling, William O. Osborn, Willard R. Zechiel, and Edward Zechiel. Professor I. S. Hahn continued as superintendent of the Culver High School until the spring of 1911.

W.P. Bland became superintendent in the fall of 1911 and continued until the spring of 1914. Superintendents to follow were:

Miss L.W. Taylor - 1915

Mr. Darnell - 1916

Mrs. McLaughlin - 1917

In the fall of 1917 Deane Walker, a Culver High School graduate in 1912, became superintendent.  Mr. Walker served as superintendent until the spring of 1919. 

In 1919, the Union Township schools and the Culver School consolidated.  The township trustee became the head of the school system and took the place of the former three member school board.  David H. Smith was trustee at this time. Deane Walker continued as head of the school as principal until the fall of 1925. 

Principals of Culver Union Township School to follow were:

J.L. Tombaugh - 1925 to fall of 1929

Floyd M. Annis - 1929 to the present time. 

The Culver School Building to house the first few years of high school was located on the ground now occupied by the Culver Hotel and the house of Dr. Witham.  Most of the building now occupied by the New Culver Hotel is a part of the old school building.

Fred Karst on the History of Culver's Schools

The first Culver school was built between 1898 and 1902. Many think it was the grade school before it became the hotel. It was probably only two stories when it was the grade school. Known to recent Culver­ites as the Osborn Hotel, the three-story frame building that stands as a landmark at the northwest corner of Ohio and Jefferson was called the New Culver Hotel in its heyday. 

David Burns, now 81, recalls attending the first grade in the building in 1915 at a time when it was used as a school. The building at that time was only two stories high, Burns said. 

The elementary school building, located about where the two-room addi­tion is being built at Culver Elementary School, had grown crowded, and the school board had spent most of the available funds on construction of a high school. Consequently, Burns said, the first grade met in the former hotel building, and the second grade also used temporary quarters nearby.

Burns said that the build­ing was constructed by a member of the prominent Osborn family -- the same man who built the Osborn Block in downtown Culver. 

Burns believes it was built in 1902, although a Civil War veteran he knew claimed that it dated from 1898. The hotel was remodeled by John Osborn, and during one period of reconstruction the third floor was added. High hopes for the build­ing remained until fairly recent times. In February 1975, it was dedicated as the Osborn Center in honor of William 0. Osborn. It was planned as a center for senior citizens. 

At the time when Burns was a student there, the first grade had a great many students, but enrollment de­clined in the higher grades, he recalled. Most students, he said, left school to enter the work force after 8th grade. Burns didn't leave school until after his sophomore year of high school, when he left to lay brick with his father. He continued in that occupation.

AN EARLY HISTORY OF CULVER HIGH SCHOOL - Mrs. W.O. Osborn

The Construction of the School 

Your present school was built in stages. The parts that remain were built in 1929, 1952, 1986 and 1990. The gym was built in 1929 and is now 65 years old. Part of the classrooms were built in 1952, so that part of your school is 42 years old. The south end where the cafeteria­-multi-purpose room is was built in 1986. This area used to be for the high school until it moved to its present home next to state road 10. So the south end of your present building is 8 years old. The north end of your elementary building had two classrooms added in 1990.

 Which makes that end of your school only 4 years old. If we include the basement which belonged to the first elementary school that was here in 1906, part of your school would be 88 years old. The metal building that sits by your playground has been here since World War II, so the age of it is not known. It has served as a storage area, the shop for the high school students, and the band room for the high school and grade school students. It belonged to the Army before we received it, so it's age is questionable. We received the building around 1946.

Since the buildings were built at different times, different construction companys worked on your elementary building. The gym was built by Russel L. Easterday Construction Co. They also built the part that was built in 1952. The Cafeteria-muti-purpose area was built by H. G. Christman Construction Co. and the two new classrooms built in 1990 were built by Easterday Construction Co. 

When the elementary was built in 1952, the principal was Shelton Kaiser.  I have a picture of him and the first group of teachers who taught in your elementary.I also put a picture of the Superintendent of Schools on that page because in 1952 the Superintendent was for the whole county. Now our Superintendent, Mr Mills is just in charge of our schools, not the whole county. He still has a very big job. 

The school is 42 years old. The south end where the cafeteria­-multi-purpose room is was built in 1986. This area used to be for the high school until it moved to its present home next to state road 10. So the south end of your present building is 8 years old. The north end of your elementary building had two classrooms added in 1990. Which makes that end of your school only 4 years old. If we include the basement which belonged to the first elementary school that was here in 1906, part of your school would be 88 years old. The metal building that sits by your playground has been here since World War II, so the age of it is not known.

It has served as a storage area, the shop for the high school students, and the band room for the high school and grade school students.           It belonged to the Army before we received it, so it's age is questionable. We received the building around 1946. 

Since the buildings were built at different times, different construction companys worked on your elementary building. The gym was built by Russel L. Easterday Construction Co. They also built the part that was built in 1952. The Cafeteria-muti-purpose area was built by H. G. Christman Construction Co. and the two new classrooms built in 1990 were built by Easterday Construction Co. 

The First Principal 

When the elementary was built in 1952, the principal was Shelton Kaiser.  I have a picture of him and the first group of teachers who taught in your elementary.    I also put a picture of the Superintendent of Schools on that page because in 1952 the Superintendent was for the whole county. Now our Superintendent, Mr Mills is just in charge of our schools, not the whole county. He still has a very big job. 

Teachers 

I decided to choose the teacher who has taught the longest in your school and is still teaching. In years past many teachers taught 40 to 50 years, but it would be difficult to find who has really taught the longest. Mary E. Weirick started teaching in 1960 which was 34 years ago. Her picture is in your book. 

I will let your teacher explain how she goes about getting her supplies for the classroom. As a school board member we pay the bills and set budgets, but the day to day workings of the school is left to the principals, teachers. and Mr. Mills. 

The school board has many duties and it would be a long list. Our main job is to make sure all of our students get a good education and have a good environment to work and learn in. We try to listen to all the people in our community to make our school the very best place it can be.

Formal Dedication of the Elemantary Building - Union Township Schools, Culver Indiana

Tuesday Evening, November 17, 1953

Therefore when we build let us think we build for­ever. Let it not be for present delight…not for present use alone. Let it be such a work as our descendants will thank us for, and let us think, as we lay stone on stone, that a time will come when those stones will be held sacred because our hands touched them or that men will say as they look upon the labor and wrought sub­stance of them, "See! This our fathers did for us."

- John Ruskin, Copy of the dedication booklet for the new elementary building.

An Indian Maiden Discovers Culver's School  by JEANNE SCOTT, from the 1930 Maxinkuckee, Culver High School's yearbook.

Some eighty-five years ago, a dusky Nees-wan-gee maiden sat on the white sands of the shore along the beautiful Lake Maxinkuckee, gazing into the clear, cool shallows. The reflection of the sun upon the water, casting bright bars of light on the sandy bottom and upon the face of the girl, made a pretty picture. 

"What," she meditated, "is this school I heard my father talk about? Why do the children of the palefaces go there? I shall go to Uniontown to see it." 

Her dark eyes alight with resolution, she pulled her canoe into the bushes where it would be free from the gentle waves. She stopped to listen but hearing nothing but the harsh, discordant cries of some distant waterfowl, she gave a little nod of satisfaction and disappeared with a rustle among the bushes. 

As she crept stealthily through the dense underbrush she thought, "How wonderful it was until the palefaces came and spoiled it all. They have chopped down the most beautiful of the trees and have made them into ugly log cabins. They have even rolled the logs into large piles and burned them. Now they have made this thing which they call a school. What is it?" Again she became silent and brooding. At the edge of the woods she could see in the middle of a clearing a long, low log structure with a clapboard roof. 

Upon pulling the latch string, the heavy poplar door swung open on its leather hinges. She surveyed the room cautiously before entering, but finding that it was empty, she stepped in boldly. 

It was a long room with a low ceiling and two small windows covered with oil paper, which furnished a dim light in the interior of the room. At one end there was a large fireplace, which had been made from the first kiln of brick manufactured in Marshall county. The seats were split logs elevated to suit the size of the pupils by means of legs. The bare ground was covered with a large puncheon floor, and the only remaining object in the room was a large box in which the wood was kept for the fireplace. 

This was the first school in Marshall County as seen by the Nees-wa-gee maiden. Our first school must have been around 1845.

This Is Culver High School - From the 1952 Tomahawk, Culver High School's yearbook.

Culver High School came into being in the fall of 1896 when a three-year course was first offered. The first graduating class was in 1899 when four energetic students received their diplomas. There was no graduating class in 1904 as the high school course had been extended to the standard four years, but since 1905 Culver has always had a graduating class. 

The early years of the high school found it housed in a building located on Ohio Street between Jef­ferson and Washington streets, now occupied by the New Culver Hotel and the Dr. Robert L. Witham residence. In fact, most of the structure now oc­cupied by the hotel is a part of that old build­ing. 

In 1906 the high school moved into a new home­the present grade school building. Basketball was played on the second floor court until the increasing enrollment required that the area be used for class rooms. Basketball was then played in the limited confines of Crook's Hall until the present high school building was constructed in 1921. 

But it was soon evident that the gymnasium in this new building was too small and that the space was needed for class rooms, so the Community Building was erected and dedicated in 1929 with a basketball victory over Plymouth. Now in 1952 a new grade building is being erected on the site of the 1906 structure. Education in Union Township marches on! 

Following is a roll of those who have lead our schools: I. S. Hahn, 1896-1911; W. P. Bland, 1911­1914; Miss L. W. Taylor, 1914-1915; J. D. Darnell, 1915-16; Mrs. L. W. (Taylor) McLaughlin, 1916-17; Deane E. Walker, 1917-25; J. L. Tombaugh, 1925-29; Floyd M. Annis, 1929-?

In 1919 Union Township and Culver schools con­solidated in a township system and the township trustee replaced the three-member school board as head of the school system. David H. Smith was the trustee at that time, and he has been succeeded by Glenn Snapp, John E. Dennis, David H. Smith, Dunn W. Weaver, and Maurice A. Curtis. 

The Culver High School Alumni Association was organized in 1912 and at each commencement has held a reunion for C.H.S. graduates.

Our Gymnasium by Floyd M. Annis, From the 1930 Maxinkuckee.

Contemplating on the number, size and structure of gymnasium and community building in this and other communities during the past decade, the question pertinently arises, Why this expansive and sometimes expensive building program? Does the means justify the end?

Some years ago a committee appointed by the National Educational Association was given the task of formulating the cardinal points in education as aims for achievement and accomplishment. Without any evasion or disagreement the committee recommended, and since has had the unqualified approval of the educational field, as well as of the laymen, that the health program be given the primary place among the seven cardinal points. 

It is then for this enlarged field of health development-physical training and health education-that this expansive building program has been carried on in this as well as in other communities.

This health program contemplates the building of healthy bodies and minds through a program of corrective gymnastics, play, clean athletic sports, folk dances, etc. 

Not only has it been strongly recommended by this committee that this health program be given a place of first importance in our educational plan, but in Indiana as well as in other states legislative acts have made it compulsory that such courses be made an integral part of our school curriculum. 

Although this requisite program need not function completely before 1932, yet this community, realizing that the welfare of the child is in question, has provided one of the best gymnasiums and community buildings in this part of the state for the development of its youth, and such courses are now a part of their regular school program.