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Local Indian Lore and Resources

The Indians of the Culver Area:

MarkerIndian Chiefs of Lake Maxinkuckee:

Chief Aubbeenaubbee 

Chief Nees-Wau-Gee 

Pau-Koo-Shuck 

MarkerThe Local Chiefs and the Trail of Death of 1838:    

Chief Menominee

Fr. Benjamin Petit

Menominee's Monument

MarkerOther Local Indian Resources:

Mark Roeder's Text on the Indians of Lake Maxinkuckee

Daniel McDonald: His Writings and Legacy Related to the Indians

George Winter's Artwork

Other Writings on Local Indians & Links

George Winter:

English-born artist George Winter, who moved to Logansport in the 1830s, did more to visually (and textually) document the daily lives, style of dress, and removal of the Pottowatomi Indians than probably any other person. His extensive array of sketches and paintings depict in meticulous detail the colors and styles of Indian attire, and the lifestyle and living quarters of the Indians in the area of Cass, Fulton, and Marshall Counties. His artwork is a fascinating and indispensible view of our area before its major settlement. His journals, also, sought to document the last days of the group he often referred to as "the sons of the forest."

Winter's artwork and journals may be found in two books. The most recent, Indians and a changing frontier : the art of George Winter (compiled by Sarah E. Cooke and Rachel Ramadhyani ; essays by Christian F. Feest and R. David Edmunds), was published by the Indiana Historical Society in 1993. The earlier book, which is now out of print, The Journals and Indian Paintings of George Winter, was published during the 1940s, also by the IHS. Both books are available at the Culver-Union Twp. Public Library.

Much of George Winter's work is collected at the Tippecanoe County Historical Museum.

George Winter online:

The Tippecanoe County Historical Museum's George Winter Collection

The Indiana Historical Society on Indians and a Changing Frontier

Meet George Winter from the Fulton County Historical Society

Excerpts from Winter's Journals on the Pottowatomi Removal

Resources for Further Research on Culver Area Indians: 

MARK A ROEDER'S TEXT ON THE INDIANS AROUND LAKE MAXINKUCKEE

Daniel McDonald on local Native American history:

Daniel McDonald's 1898 book, REMOVAL OF THE POTTAWATOMIE INDIANS FROM INDIANA, online full-text here.

 Daniel McDonald on local Native American history (from A History of Marshall County):

COMING OF THE POTTAWATTOMIE INDIANS

REMOVAL OF POTTAWATTOMIE INDIANS

INDIAN TREATIES

INDIAN BORDER WARS

INDIAN LOVEMAKING AND MARRIAGE

ARROW POINTS, INDIAN RELICS, ETC

McDonald's Removal of the Pottowatamie Indians book, full-text, from 1898, contains a great deal of background on the local Indians. Click to view.

The life, writings, and legacy of Daniel McDonald here.

Other Sources:

The Fulton County Historical Society has done extensive research and activism regarding the Trail of Death, including the annual Trail of Courage Rendezvous festival, the placing of highway markers and monuments in several states along the Trail of Death pathway, and the re-publication of the letters and journals of Fr. Benjamin Petit alongside numerous other facts, images, and information in Potawatomi Trail of Death: 1838 Removal from Indiana to Kansas (Fulton County Historical Society, 2003 -- order the book here).

Fulton County Historian Shirley Willard's articles on Chief Menominee and the Trail of Death

Shirley Willard's "Diary" of the Trail of Death

Chief Menominee Statue and History from arealinks

More on the Trail of Death from this site