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Long Point

Long Point was another early destination on Lake Maxinkuckee, particularly for visitors from the Rochester and Logansport areas (it was, in fact, called "Rochester Point" at one time for the proliferation of Fulton County residents there, as the article below attests.

Long Point is also central in early local lore as the spot from which the ghost of the Indian Pau-Koo-Shuk, son of Chief Aubeenaubbee, rows his canoe on foggy nights. Click here to read more of that story.

Long Point Postcard 01Long Point Postcard 02Long Point Postcard 0

Three postcards depicting Long Point during its heyday. The first is dated 1910 and the others undated.

Arlington Pier and Str. Lloyd McSheey

"Scenes at Lake Maxinkuckee," a 1906 postcard which depicts "Arlington Pier and Str. Lloyd McSheey" at Long Point.

Long Point

This 1908 postcard depicts Long Point in an unusual image.

Long Point

A 1911 postcard depicting Long Point.

Children Walking Railroad

Another very rare photo from the John Cleveland collection, this one depicts children walking the Vandalia railroad on the Lake. This shot appears to me to be west of Culver where the Lake curves away from Long Point (having walked that track myself many times as a child, when it still existed!), but I am open to correction. No date is given but the dress of the children certainly indicates a number of years back!

Swimming in Lake Maxinkuckee

"Swimming in Lake Maxinkuckee," an unusual, undated postcard showing Long Point in the background.

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The Weirick family pier is the foreground of this photo from the Jim Weirick collection taken between the 1940s and 1960s. This shot was taken from West Shore Drive just south of Culver's Masonic cemetary. Long Point is visible in the background.

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Members of Jim Weirick's family standing on the bridge over Lake Maxinkuckee's outlet, with Long Point in the background. This photo was probably taken in the 1940s from today's West Shore Drive.

Outlet Bridge Lake Maxinkuckee Weirick Collection

A member of Jim Weirick's family on West Shore Drive just south of Culver's Masonic cemetary. In the background is the bridge above Lake Maxinkuckee's outlet, as well as a partial view of Long Point at the time. A photo from the Jim Weirick collection, probably taken in the 1940s

Weirick Family pier Lake Maxinkuckee West Shore

The Weirick family pier is the foreground of this photo from the Jim Weirick collection taken between the 1940s and 1960s. This shot was taken from West Shore Drive just south of Culver's Masonic cemetary. Long Point is visible in the background.

 

From the Rochester Sentinel, Friday, July 22, 1904: PASSING OF LONG POINT From Culver Citizen: The recent transfer of the extreme north end of Long Point by Hon. Milo R. Smith, of Rochester, to Mr. Chadwick of the Chadwick Hotel, for $2,000, marks another important era in the history of that noted location on the lake, and indicates the rapid rise in the value of lake property within the past score of years. Time was not so very far back in the past when that particular piece of property was not considered of much value. Some thirty odd years ago the writer of this could have purchased it from Dr. G. A. Durr, who then owned it, for $60, and but for a misunderstanding in the description, the purchase would have been made. All in all it is the finest piece of vacant ground on the lake, and for many purposes its location cannot be excelled anywhere.

This and the lake front south to the Arlington Hotel, is called "Long Point," in accordance with "the lay of the land." Originally, and for many years, it was called "Rochester Point," for the reason that in an early day several Rochester people purchased lots there and erected a club house. Until about the time of the completion of the Vandalia railroad only Rochester people spent the summer there. With the coming of the railroad also came people from Logansport, Terre Haute, Indianapolis, etc. until now there is not an unoccupied property on the whole point. There is considerable history and a good deal of tradition associated with this portion of the lake which has been quite fully written up for the history of Maxinkuckee Lake soon to be published by the "Maxinkuckee Association."

The "Chadwick Point," was an Indian burial place, as human bones were found in a mound in the early settlement of the country. The late Maj. McFaddin of Logansport, insisted that Pau-Koo-Shuk, the son who killed his father, Aubeenaubbee, and who died at Winamac about 1838, was buried there. But quite a number of people had been residents about the lake for two years previous, and none of them remembered such an occurrence. It is more than likely that the genial and good hearted Major drew on his brilliant and vivid imagination for his facts. -- Daniel McDonald.